Crooks are exploiting known vulnerabilities in the popular Drupal CMS such as Drupalgeddon2 and Drupalgeddon3 to deliver cryptocurrency miners, remote administration tools (RATs) and tech support scams.

Security experts at Malwarebytes reported that compromised Drupal websites are used to deliver cryptocurrency miners, remote administration tools (RATs) and tech support scams.

Crooks are exploiting known vulnerabilities in the popular Drupal CMS such as Drupalgeddon2 and Drupalgeddon3 to deliver cryptocurrency miners, remote administration tools (RATs) and tech support scams.

The two remote code execution security vulnerabilities, tracked as CVE-2018-7600 and CVE-2018-7602 have been already fixed by Drupal developers.

At the end of March, the Drupal Security Team confirmed that a “highly critical” vulnerability (dubbed Drupalgeddon2), tracked as CVE-2018-7600, was affecting Drupal 7 and 8 core and announced the availability of security updates on March 28th.

The vulnerability was discovered by the Drupal developers Jasper Mattsson.

Both Drupal 8.3.x and 8.4.x are no more supported, but due to the severity of the flaw, the Drupal Security Team decided to address it with specific security updates and experts called it Drupalgeddon2.

The development team released the security update in time to address CVE-2018-7600.

After the publication of a working Proof-Of-Concept for Drupalgeddon2 on GitHub for “educational or information purposes,” experts started observing bad actors attempting to exploit the flaw.

A week after the release of the security update, the experts at security firm Check Point along with Drupal experts at Dofinity analyzed the CMS to analyzed the Drupalgeddon2 vulnerability and published a technical report on the flaw.

After the publication of the report. the expert Vitalii Rudnykh shared a working  Proof-Of-Concept for Drupalgeddon2 on GitHub for “educational or information purposes.”

Immediately after the disclosure of the PoC, security experts started observing bad actors attempting to exploit the flaw.

Other security firms observed threat actors have started exploiting the flaw to install malware on the vulnerable websites, mainly cryptocurrency miners.

The experts at the SANS Internet Storm Center reported several attacks delivering a cryptocurrency miner, a PHP backdoor, and an IRC bot written in Perl.

At the end of April, the Drupal team fixed a new highly critical remote code execution issue (dubbed Drupalgeddon 3) tracked as CVE-2018-7602 with the release of versions 7.59, 8.4.8 and 8.5.3.

Also in this case, cybercriminals started exploiting the CVE-2018-7602 to hijack servers and install cryptocurrency miners.

The experts from Malwarebytes conducted an analysis of attacks involving Drupalgeddon2 and Drupalgeddon3 and discovered that most of the compromised Drupal sites had been running version 7.5.x, while roughly 30 percent had been running version 7.3.x, which was last updated in August 2015.

“Almost half the sites we flagged as compromised were running Drupal version 7.5.x, while version 7.3.x still represented about 30 percent, a fairly high number considering it was last updated in August 2015. Many security flaws have been discovered (and exploited) since then.” reads the analysis published by Malwarebytes.

Drupal hacked websites

More than 80 percent of the compromised websites had been web cryptocurrency miners, Coinhive injections remain by far the most popular choice, followed by public or private Monero pools.

“We collected different types of code injection, from simple and clear text to long obfuscated blurbs. It’s worth noting that in many cases the code is dynamic—most likely a technique to evade detection,” continues the report.

Roughly 12 percent of the attacks delivered RATs or password stealers disguised as web browser updates, while Tech support scams accounted for nearly 7 percent of the client-side attacks.

Pierluigi Paganini

(Security Affairs – Drupalgeddon, hacking)

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